How to get your book in print – 7 Steps.

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My first book in print. Easier than I thought.

I was downtown today and decided to check the mail.  I opened the PO Box and received a card saying “Pick up your package.”  So I did.

I got home and opened the box.  I looked inside and saw 10 copies of my book.

I was happy.  It was a long time coming.

I already had the kindle version up and available.  But, getting the print version seemed … well … ok, I’ll admit it … it seemed too difficult.  So, I dropped the project.

But, while writing my second book, I decided it was time -time to tackle the print copy.  Part of my motivation was directly due to my mother.  She asked for a print copy … I didn’t have one.  It bothered me that my mother wanted one but I didn’t have one.  I felt compelled to correct this discrepancy.

Well, thanks to my mother, I now have both my books available in print copy.  And, making the print copy was easier than I thought.  Now, it did take some noodling out; some research; some trial and error; and of course some time; but in the end it was worth it and it’s very doable.

Here’s the great news … if I can do it – anyone can.  That means you.  So, the book you’ve been meaning to write – the great story you have to tell the world – is now ready to come out; no excuse; folks are waiting to read it; you can do it!

How to get your book in print … 7 easy steps.

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Have you ever sent out a memo … and wished you hadn’t?

Have you ever sent out a memo – been very proud of it; put lots of work into it; lots of thought – only to receive some embarrassing feedback about something you missed?  Something big; something obvious.  Could have easily been avoided if you had someone check it first before sending it out to the whole organization?  Your friend could have spotted the “gotcha” and saved you.

Well, I have.  And, I seen others do it.  But, one situation that particularly sticks out happened while I was stationed in Woomera, South Australia as a young lieutenant with the US Air Force.  Our new site nurse sent out a memo and boy did she miss something.  But, I’m glad she did because it makes a great story and got us all laughing – even the new site nurse.  After getting over the initial embarrassment, she thought it was hilarious too.

This is an entry taken from my upcoming book, Yanks in the Outback: A story of Woomera, South Australia, The Joint Defense Facility Nurrungar (JDFN) and the First Gulf War. The book is completed and will be available in both Kindle electronic version and print copy in June 2015.  You can pre-order the kindle now.

Note:  Book is fiction but based on my real life experience while stationed in Woomera with the US Air Force from February 1990 until May 1991.  Characters are made up but most are based on real people.

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Pacman Rap!

What do I know about rap music?

Not much.

But, when asked a few weeks ago to come up with a performance for the Philippine Independence Day celebration this June, I decided to look into this “rap” thing.  I figured it would be fun – or should I say funny – for an old man like me to do some rapping.

And, I do have a bit of experience; last year I did a rap song with my daughter and it was a lot of fun and well received by the audience.  So, I figured – why not do another one this year.

Now I just had to figure out what song?  Hmmmmm …

Got it!

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ANZAC Day 100 Years: Alice Springs Dawn Service.

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ANZAC Day – 100 years on – ANZAC Hill Alice Springs.

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What did the digger’s eat? Hard tack and canned meat …

I spent early yesterday morning on top of ANZAC Hill.  But, I wasn’t alone – far from it.  Seemed like hundreds of locals and visitors made the pre-dawn trek to witness the ANZAC Day 100 year commemoration.

I left the house at 5:00 a.m. figuring I had plenty of time to park my car and climb up ANZAC Hill and locate a good place to witness the ceremony prior to the 6 a.m. start.  But, when I reached the top at about 5:20 a.m. I was greeted by throngs of people nudging their way to the best viewing positions.  I somehow managed to scooch forward arriving in the second row behind the podium; pretty good spot for someone who arrived a bit “late.”

I couldn’t get over the number of people in attendance.  The whole top of ANZAC Hill was jammed with spectators.  And, there was a viewing screen at the bottom of the hill which suggests there were lots more people below watching remotely.

The ceremony was spectacular.  The military team marched with precision taking up their positions around the center monument.  An Air Force officer gave an inspiring speech personalizing the ANZAC experience sharing stories about individual soldiers who experienced the fateful campaign back in 1915. An alternating prayer spoken by an Australian priest and a New Zealand priest caused me to reflect as  I pondered the fate of the ANZACs rowing onto the shores of Gallipoli 100 years ago.  And the choir group – We are One – lifted my spirit as they sang the Australian and NZ national anthems.

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Want to see my Grandpa’s War Medals?

2011-115-1 Medal, War Merit Cross, Germany, Reverse

Walt’s grandfather was a pilot in World War II.

Back in 1999 or so I was having a conversation with a few co-workers; the topic – World War II.  Then from across the room we hear, “Hey my grandfather was in the war.  He was a pilot.  I’ve got all his medals.  Wanna see em?”

It was Walt.  Normally a rather quiet guy, he was showing unusual animation.  He was so excited we couldn’t resist.  “Sure, bring em in.”

“Ok, I’ll bring em in tommorrow!”

I wasn’t really that interested in seeing the medals.  I figured they’d be some generic looking awards; like the kind you get when you compete in a boy scout jamboree.  Nothing special; just run-of-the mill – “you done your service” – type medals.  But, Walt was so enthusiastic, I felt he deserved an audience and – who knows – maybe they’ll be something special after all; something to talk about; something impressive.

The next day at work, sometime in mid-morning, Walt announced, “Hey I got my grandfathers medals from World War II.  Who wants to see them?”

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